Thursday, March 3, 2016

How To Effectively Run Your Child's Football Team

As a parent, you’ve probably been roped into a great many of your children’s activities. After all, they’re at that age where they want to be active and running about, and that usually means you’ll have to be the one helping them out!

Many kids are members of a football team, and these are almost always volunteer driven. The parents don’t get paid, but they’re rewarded with that great big smile on their child’s face. It’s not always easy to get this right, especially if the team in question has a lot of members. You have to organise matches, events, rewards and training, all while working during the day and cooking dinner at night. As a parent, multitasking is key!

This post will run you through some of the things you should be doing if you find yourself in this position. You don’t necessarily have to be a sporting expert; you just have to be organised and decisive!

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1. Keep training interesting and fun

Look, you’re not coaching professional athletes here. These kids just want to have fun with their friends, so your training should reflect that. Instead of having them do boring drills, mix it up a bit with games and friendly, competitive matches. There are a tonne of great videos on YouTube that can show you a number of drills, so use these resources.

A warm-up game of dodgeball is a great way to loosen the joints and engage the kids from the off. You don’t have to plan a perfect, pro-level training session, you just have to make it active and enjoyable.

2. Reward them, to encourage friendly competition

Everybody, including youngsters, likes to win stuff. It makes us feel proud and provides a sense of achievement for things we know we did well. Your child’s sports team may not partake in high-level tournaments, that doesn’t mean they shouldn’t win anything.

You could offer them trophies, medals or even chocolate bars as rewards for hard training. For example, a football trophy from Premier Trophies would be a super way to encourage those budding-Rooney’s. And as a bonus, it would keep them invested in the club week after week.

3. Don’t shout from the sidelines

You’re not a kid anymore, so don’t act like it! Time and time again I’ve seen parents hollering and jeering at the kids on the pitch, and it’s embarrassing. Sports are a fun, inclusive activity, so any harmful language and behaviour should be stopped immediately.

If you notice any other adults behaving this way, get them to stop. You’re all here to watch your children have a good time, so keep everything focussed on that!

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4. Teach them the basics, and let them flourish

Again, you have to remember they’re just kids. Don’t live your broken dreams through them and try and make them professionals overnight. Teach them the basics, and stop there. Don’t confuse them with ridiculous jargon or complicated moves. Let them discover their own identity, and you’ll see them grow in ways you could never imagine.

5. Get them a kit, or matching colours

To avoid your training and matches looking a little hodgepodge, invest in some cheap matching shirts. It looks great when they’re all standing together, and it makes them feel more cohesive. Kits encourage teamwork and friendliness, and these are traits that you want to impress upon youngsters.

And that’s the list! If you’re struggling with getting your kids active and healthy, check out our helpful tips here.





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